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Awake: A Moslem Woman’s Rare Memoir of Her Life and Partnership with the Editor of Molla Nasreddin, the Most Influential Satirical Journal of the Caucasus and Iran, 1907–1931

The marriage between Hamideh Khanum, the daughter of a leading aristocratic Azerbaijani family, and Mirza Jalil Mamadqulizadeh, founder and editor of the renowned satirical journal Molla Nasreddin, was a union of like-minded spirits. Both wanted to educate their community in the first quarter of the 20th century, during a period of great turmoil in their country. [read more>>]

Crowning Anguish: Memoirs of a Persian Princess from the Harem to Modernity 1884-1914

Crowning Anguish: Memoirs of a Persian Princess from the Harem to Modernity 1884-1914

“A Thousand and One Nights meets Raise the Red Lantern in this tale of growing up among royal wives and concubines in what is now Iran . . . . [read more>>]

Inside Iran: Women’s Lives

“Howard places in context the history and politics of gender in Iran, making this volume accessible to a popular audience.” – Library Journal, July 2002 . [read more>>]

Savushun

Savushun (Kindle/iPad Version)

“An engrossing chronicle of life in Persia-just-turned-Iran by Simin Daneshvar. Her compassionate vision of traditional folk ways surviving amid the threats of modernity (including Allied occupation) give her work a resonant universality. Recent events only strengthen her position as a writer deserving a wider audience.” – USA Today. [read more>>]

Savushun

Savushun

“An engrossing chronicle of life in Persia-just-turned-Iran by Simin Daneshvar. Her compassionate vision of traditional folk ways surviving amid the threats of modernity (including Allied occupation) give her work a resonant universality. Recent events only strengthen her position as a writer deserving a wider audience.” – USA Today. [read more>>]

Daneshvar’s Playhouse: A Collection of Stories

Daneshvar’s Playhouse: A Collection of Stories

“In five intriguing stories, the formal detachment of Daneshvar’s prose reinforces her subtle revelation of repressive features in Iranian society. The author, one of the few wellknown women writers in Iran, is a feminist opposed to both political tyranny and religious fanaticism, themes obliquely indicated here. [read more>>]